Township: Crossapol

Map Reference: Crossapol 14

Name Type: shore

Meaning: Crossapol | This small, rocky inlet lies below Crossapol Farm; a short distance to the east there is a small, sandy bay today called ScG Am Port Bàn 'the sandy inlet'.

One folk etymology is contained in the traditional saying, 'Mìosachan beag rìgh Lochlainn / Fo chlachan ann am Baile Phuill / Is Ulabhag nighean rìgh Lochlainn / Fo chlachan ann an Crosapol ud thall' (Grant 1925, 12). This has been translated: 'The little calendar of the king of Norway / Underneath stones in Balephuil / And Ulabhag daughter of the king of Norway / Underneath stones in Crossapol yonder.' (Black 2008, 511)
This feature was also connected at a later date (in a case of 'literary folk etymology') to the Romantic poem Lord Ulva’s Daughter, who is said to have been buried nearby: 'Above the Crossapol beach and below the public road there is a small artificial mound with an erection in the middle of it of about three feet diameter on the inside. This is the spot that local tradition points to as the grave of Lord Ullin’s daughter, the subject of Thomas Campbell’s famous poem. It is supposed that her drowned body came ashore on the beach below and is buried here' (MacDougall 1937, 86). This feature is actually an Early Bronze Age burial mound.
Lord Ullin's Daughter was written by Thomas Campbell (1777-1844). Campbell was from Glasgow but his family came from Kirnan, Argyll. The poem tells the story of the Lord of Ulva trying to cross Lochgyle with Lord Ullin's daughter, with whom he was eloping: 'A chieftain to the Highlands bound / Cries 'Boatman, do not tarry! / And I'll give thee a silver pound?/ To row us o'er the ferry!'?Lord Ullin rides up to the ferry only to see his daughter drown in front of him.
However, despite these later traditions this is likely to be a Norse name. The specific may be a male ON personal name such as Úlfr. The generic may be either ON vík ‘bay’ with vowel affection, or vágr 'sheltered bay', although this latter is usually reserved for larger features.
There is also a Loch an Ulbhaidh in Lairg, Sutherland and the small island of Ulva (possibly 'the island of Úlfr') can be seen from this point off the west coast of Mull; Ulvik is the name of a kommune in Norway (NG).

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Information:“Above the Crossapol beach and below the public road there is a small artificial mound with an erection in the middle of it of about three feet diameter on the inside. This is the spot that local tradition points to as the grave of Lord Ullin’s daughter, the subject of Thomas Campbell’s famous poem. It is supposed that her drowned body came ashore on the breach below and is buried here.” [likely to be the Neolithic cairn - JH] - Handbook to the Islands of Coll and Tiree, Hector MacDougall and Rev. Hector Cameron, Archibald Sinclair, p86.

Lord Ullin's Daughter is a famous poem written by Thomas Campbell (1777-1844) from Glasgow but whose family came from Kirnan, Argyll:

"A chieftain to the Highlands bound
Cries 'Boatman, do not tarry!
And I'll give thee a silver pound
To row us o'er the ferry!'

It tells the story of the Lord of Ulva trying to cross Lochgyle with Lord Ullin's daughter, with whom he is eloping. Lord Ullin rides up to the ferry only to see his daughter drown in front of him.

Lord Ulva's daughter washed up on the shore and buried here - JP.



Local Form:

Languages : Gaelic

Informants: Janet Paterson, Crossapol, 11/1993

Informant 2: Mairi Campbell, Corrairigh, 11/1993