Township: Baugh

Map Reference: Baugh 25

Name Type: watercourse

Meaning: Baugh |'On the east side of Reef there is a small inlet called the ford, or in Gaelic faodhail. A small, sluggish rivulet, having its origins in a marsh a mile and a half inland, and forming the eastern boundary of Reef, runs into this inlet and constitutes the two divisions of this island called the east and west end. Spring tides often render the passage across the ford impractible at the usual place and a small stone bridge has been built half a mile further up for the convenience of travellers.' (New Statistical Account 1845 Tiree and Coll, 196; see Bàgh) This crossing was an important transport link between the east and west ends of Tiree. Today the stream's mouth is completely blocked by sand that has drifted eastwards along the beach, possibly covering an inferred shingle beach (see below). Skyr na Veuillen probably corresponds to the firmly beach-fast rock now known as ScG Eilean nan Sìolag 'the island of the sand eels', with a cluster of nearby rocks known as Na h-Iseanan 'the chicks'.

ScG An Fhadhail is a loan word from ON vaðill (dative vöðull) 'shallow water, especially places where fjords or straits can be passed on horseback' (CV, 673) > ScG fadhail (or faodhail) fem. 'extensive beach; hollow in the sand formed by, and retaining, water after the egress of the tide; ford, space between islands when rendered passable on foot through the tide receding' (Dwelly). The 1878 OS 1st edition shows a tidal ford at the mouth of the stream, and the stream name has transferred from this. By the end of the nineteenth century, the ford was no longer in use. ScG Seann Drochaid a' Bhàigh 'the old bridge of Baugh' was built inland in the early nineteenth century, while Drochaid Ùr a’ Bhàigh was built in 1878 on the site of the old ford. The stream name is not widely used today.
The name is found in other areas: Loch Fadhail, Ardchattan, Tob na Faodhail and Faodhail Seilebost, Harris (SP), and An Fhadhail in Carloway (Cox 2002, 277).
The source form Skyr na Veuillen may derive from ScG faolainn (fadhlainn) fem. 'exposed place beside the shore, covered with small white stones; sandy point' (Dwelly): 'The ON loan word faoilinn 'foreshore, upper beach' ... it applies to the raised beaches between salt and fresh water lakes.' (Cox 2002, 69) MacBain derives this from ON vaðillin 'the shallow water' with the post-position bound definite marker. There is also an An Fhaolainn in West Hynish, and a settlement Faolainn on the west coast of Skye.

Other Forms: Skyr na Veuillen Fouyl - Atlas Novus Joan Blaeu 1654 based on work by Timothy Pont who mapped Scotland between 1583 and 1596. From Illustrated Maps of Scotland Jeffrey Stone, Studio Editions, 1991.

Phuil River - The Turnbull Map of Tiree 1768 and accompanying survey text.

An Fhaodhail - OS

Related Places:

Information:Divides Tiree into An Sgireach Ear and An Sgireach Iar [the west and east districts] - SA 1971/99/A18.

On the east side of Reef there is a small inlet called the ford, or in Gaelic “foadhail”. A small, sluggish rivulet, having its origins in a marsh a mile and a half inland, and forming the eastern boundary of Reef, runs into this inlet and constitutes the two divisions of this island called the east and west end. Spring tides often render the passage across the ford impractible at the usual place and a small stone bridge has been built half a mile further up for the convenience of travellers. The tide, when swollen and agitated by winter storms, has sometimes, though very rarely, been known to rise so high and run so far into the land that the sea from the south and north has nearly met and thus almost separated the island into two. The division on the west side of the ford is the most considerable and contains at least two thirds of the whole population. NSA, 1845, p 196.
The old ford used to be behind it. When An Fhadhail was dredged by a JCB they found a hard bottom and two iron gates - Angus MacLean, Scarinish, 1/1994.

Local Form:

Languages : Gaelic

Informants: OS